Ontario’s new distracted driving law takes effect Jan. 1, 2019

by | Dec 29, 2018 | Driving, Riding, RVing

On January 1, 2019, a section of The Cannabis, Smoke-Free Ontario and Road Safety Statute Law Amendment Act that deals with distracted driving will take effect.

According to the Government of Ontario website, deaths from collisions caused by distracted driving have doubled since 2000. Data from 2013 shows that one person is injured in a distracted driving collision every half hour. A driver using a phone while driving is 4 times more likely to crash than a driver focused on the road.

Understanding New Ontario Distracted Driving Laws

Drivers with A to G licences will face the following changes:

First conviction: a fine of up to $1,000, three demerit points, a three-day day driver’s licence suspension

Second conviction within 5 years: a fine of up to $2,000, six demerit points, a seven-day driver’s licence suspension

Third and subsequent convictions within 5 years: a fine of up to $3,000, six demerit points a 30-day driver’s licence suspension

Drivers with a G1, G2, M1 or M2 licence will face the same increasing fines as drivers with A to G licences but won’t receive any demerit points. Instead of demerit points, drivers will receive the following:


  • a 30-day licence suspension for a first conviction
  • a 90-day licence suspension for a second conviction
  • cancellation of your licence and removal from the Graduated Licensing System (GLS) for a third conviction
  • cancellation of your licence and removal from the Graduated Licensing System (GLS) for a third conviction

What is distracted driving?

According to the Government of Ontario website. anything that causes a driver to be less focused on the road is considered to be distracted driving. This includes:


  • holding an electronic device such as a cell phone or GPS
  • using a cell phone to make calls or send texts
  • typing a destination into a GPS
  • reading
  • eating

Additional Information

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